THE NORTH AMERICAN
CONFERENCE ON BRITISH STUDIES
 

in conjunction with
 

THE NORTHEAST
CONFERENCE ON BRITISH STUDIES
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ANNUAL MEETING

19-21 November 1999
Royal Sonesta Hotel
Cambridge, Massachusetts








NACBS Council

President
Fred M. Leventhal (Boston University)
Vice President
Linda Levy Peck (George Washington University)
Immediate Past President
Walter L. Arnstein (University of Illinois)
Executive Secretary
Brian P. Levack (University of Texas, Austin)
Associate Executive Secretary
Patty Seleski (California State University, San Marcos)
Treasurer
Marc Baer (Hope College)
Program Chair
Chris Waters (Williams College)
Elected Council Members
James Cronin (Boston College)
James Epstein (Vanderbilt University)
Barbara J. Harris (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
Robert Tittler (Concordia University)
Margo Todd (Vanderbilt University)
 

NECBS Executive Committee

President
Susan D. Amussen (The Union Institute)
Vice President and Program Chair
Peter Weiler (Boston College)
Immediate Past President
Robert Tittler (Concordia University)
Secretary-Treasurer
Peter Hansen (Worcester Polytechnic Institute)


A NOTE FROM THE PROGRAM CHAIR
 

On behalf of the program committees and officers of the North American Conference on British Studies and the Northeast Conference on British Studies, I would like to welcome you to this year’s joint annual meeting of the two organizations and draw your attention to several special events taking place at the conference.

There will be three plenary addresses this year. On Friday, following lunch, Professor Deborah Epstein Nord (Princeton University) will be speaking on ‘Children of Hagar: Gypsy Fascination in Nineteenth-Century Britain’. Later that day, at 5:15, Professor Fred Leventhal will be delivering his Presidential Address, ‘British Writers, American Readers: Images of Britain During the Second World War’. Following the Saturday luncheon, Professor John Morrill (Cambridge University) will deliver a keynote address on "The Significance of Oliver Cromwell."

In addition to these plenary lectures, there will be two other special talks at this year’s meeting. Professor Keith Robbins (Senior Vice Chancellor of the University of Wales) will deliver an address, ‘More than a Footnote? Wales in British History’ (panel 12), an event co-sponsored by the North American Association for the Study of Welsh Culture and History. In commemoration of the 350th anniversary of the execution of Charles I, Professor Mark Kishlansky (Harvard University) will be speaking on ‘Charles I and the Early Modern Monarchy’ (panel 14).

Saturday afternoon will be devoted to three special panels of some topical interest. Panel 31, ‘Debating the Future of British Studies’, will bring together eight eminent scholars to assess the state of the field; panel 32, ‘British Studies on the World Wide Web’, will focus on how to use various web-based resources in the field; and panel 33, ‘The Making of the British Working Historian’, intended primarily for graduate students and recent recipients of the Ph.D., will address strategies for publishing and facing the challenges of the job market.

There will be two receptions this year, one on Friday and the other on Saturday. At the Friday reception (6:15-7:45) NACBS prizes will be announced. There will also be a book exhibit at the conference and we invite you to drop by—especially as we have made an effort this year to display recent publications by individuals on the program. The book exhibit is located in the Skyline foyer and will be open until 5:30 on Friday and Saturday and 1:00 on Sunday. Coffee will also be available in the Skyline foyer before the first group of panels each morning and between the first and second groups.

All room assignments listed in this program are subject to change; announcements of room changes for any of the events taking place this year will be posted.

Finally, we would like to express our gratitude to the British Council, for helping to defray the costs of our plenary speakers, and Mr William Pidduck, of Adam Matthew Publications, whose generous support of the NACBS has permitted us to subsidize the registration fees of graduate students this year.


REGISTRATION
(Skyline Foyer)

Thursday, 18th November, 3 to 6 pm
Friday, 19th November, 8 am to 5 pm
Saturday, 20th November, 8 am to noon

FRIDAY 19th NOVEMBER, 8:45-10:30
(panels 1-6)





1. NEW PERSPECTIVES ON PATRONAGE IN MID- AND LATE-TUDOR ENGLAND

Room: University A

Chair:

Dale Hoak (The College of William and Mary) Gender, Patronage and Modes of Approach: Women’s Letters of Petition in England, 1540-1603 James Daybell (University of Reading) ‘To have your Honour’s countenance’: The Earl of Essex and the Dynamics of Patronage Paul Hammer (University of Adelaide) Military Affinities and the Structures of Lordship in Early Modern England David Trim (Newbold College) Commentator: Ralph A. Houlbrooke (University of Reading)


2. HONOUR CULTURE IN EARLY MODERN ENGLAND

Room: Skyline D

Chair:

Susan D. Amussen (The Union Institute) Violence and Gentry Honour in Early Stuart England Richard Cust (University of Birmingham) Francis Bacon, the Earl of Northampton and the Jacobean Anti-duelling Campaign Markku Peltonen (University of Helsinki and Clare Hall, Cambridge) Civility’s Enemies: Violence and Disorder in the Age of Shaftesbury Victor Stater (Louisiana State University) Commentator: Catherine Patterson (University of Houston)
FRIDAY 19th NOVEMBER, 8:45-10:30 (panels 1-6), cont’d
 
 

3. RETHINKING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY WAR: EMPIRE, FRONTIERS, IDENTITIES

Room: Skyline E

Chair:

Paul Monod (Middlebury College) Conquering Desires: Women, Nations and Identities in the American Revolution Kathleen Wilson (State University of New York, Stony Brook) The Problem of English Identity in the American Revolution Dror Wahrman (Indiana University) Race, Geography and Law: The Problem of the Frontier in Eighteenth-Century British Imperial History Eliga H. Gould (University of New Hampshire) Commentator: James A. Epstein (Vanderbilt University)
4. MASCULINITIES AND THE CULTURE OF EMPIRE, PART I Room: Skyline A

Chair:

Laura Mayhall (Catholic University of America) ‘Cutting off the sailors’ pigtails’: Domesticating the Maritime in Britain, 1750-1850 Isaac Land (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) Hierarchies of Civilisation, Missionary Practice and the Construction of Middle-Class Masculinities in Early Nineteenth-Century Britain Alison Twells (Sheffield Hallam University) All Things to All Men: The Salvation Army and Cultural Cross-Dressing in British India John W. Mackey (Boston College) Masculinity, Empire and Naval Seamen in British Popular Culture, 1870-1914 Mary A. Conley (Boston College) Commentator: Kali Israel (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor)
FRIDAY 19th NOVEMBER, 8:45-10:30 (panels 1-6), cont’d
 
 

5. DIRT, DISEASE AND THE SOCIAL BODY FROM THE 1830s TO THE 1930s

Room: Skyline C

Chair:

Harriet Ritvo (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) At Risk: Contagion and the Production of Social Continuity in the Early Victorian City Tina Young Choi (University of California, Berkeley) Dirty Pictures: Art and Victorian Sanitation Reform Eileen Cleere (Simmons College) ‘Where there’s dirt there’s danger’: Health Education in English Elementary Schools, 1918-1939 Katherine Rashid (University of Pennsylvania) Commentator: John Plotz (Johns Hopkins University)
6. PATTERNS AND PERCEPTIONS OF VIOLENCE, 1850-1939 Room: Skyline B

Chair:

Linda Mahood (University of Guelph) Violence, Policing and Community in Liverpool and Manchester, 1850-1914 John E. Archer (Edge Hill College) A Brutalised Society? Reactions to Violence in Postwar Britain, 1918-1922 Jon Lawrence (University of Liverpool) A Scottish Chicago? Street Gangs and Violence in Glasgow in the 1920s and 1930s Andrew Davies (University of Liverpool) Commentator: Susan Pedersen (Harvard University)


FRIDAY 19th NOVEMBER, 10:45-12:30
(panels 7-12)





7. THE QUESTION OF ANGLICAN ORTHODOXY IN TUDOR AND STUART ENGLAND

Room: University A

Chair:

Judith Maltby (Corpus Christi College, Oxford University) Via Media Revisited Lori Anne Ferrell (Claremont Graduate University) The Battle of the Altars in Caroline England David Cressy (Ohio State University) Anglican Parochialism in Seventeenth-Century Cathedral Cities Carl B. Estabrook (Dartmouth College) Commentator: Peter Lake (Princeton University)


8. MULTIPLYING EMPIRES / TRADING PLACES

Room: Skyline B

Chair:

Steven Pincus (University of Chicago) ‘Colonial quotation’ and the Rhetoric of Imperialism  Barbara Fuchs (University of Washington) Aphra Behn’s Oronooko and the Construction of English Colonial Identity Shannon Miller (Temple University) Extending Credit: Thomas Harriot and Ralph Lane in Virginia David J. Baker (University of Hawaii, Manoa) Commentator: Mary C. Fuller (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
FRIDAY 19th NOVEMBER, 10:45-12:30 (panels 7-12), cont’d
 
 

9. WOMEN AND CREDIT IN ENGLAND, 1600-1850

Room: Skyline D

Chair:

Patty Seleski (California State University, San Marcos) Surplus Women with Surplus Money: The Role of Singlewomen as Creditors in Early Modern England Amy M. Froide (University of Tennessee, Chattanooga) Women, the Informal Economy and the Development of Capitalism in England, 1650-1850; or, Did Women Get Credit? Beverly Lemire (University of New Brunswick) Small Sums to Risk: London Women’s Investments in the Age of the Financial Revolution Barbara J. Todd (University of Toronto) Commentator: Margaret Hunt (Amherst College)
10. MASCULINITIES AND THE CULTURE OF EMPIRE, PART II Room: Skyline C

Chair:

Deborah Gorham (Carleton University) Mr. Pooter Goes Abroad: Empire, Migration and Empowerment for Lower Middle-Class Men, 1900-1970  A. James Hammerton (La Trobe University) Masculinity and the Idea of Decay in Turn-of-the-Century British India Matthew Stone (University of Southern California) ‘To present to my young countrymen an example of manly perseverance’: David Livingstone, Masculinity, Race and Empire Christopher Petrusic (Carleton University) Commentator: Dorothy O. Helly (Hunter College, CUNY)
  FRIDAY 19th NOVEMBER, 10:45-12:30 (panels 7-12), cont’d
 

11. FROM THE OLD POOR LAW TO THE WELFARE STATE


12. WALES AND BRITISH STUDIES


This special panel, and Professor Robbins’ appearance at the conference, is sponsored by the North American Association for the Study of Welsh Culture and History (NAASWCH)


FRIDAY 19th NOVEMBER, 12:30-2:30

LUNCH
(Room: Grand Ballroom B)

PLENARY SESSION

Co-chairs:
Susan D. Amussen (President, NECBS; The Union Institute)
Fred M. Leventhal (President, NACBS; Boston University)
 

Plenary Address:

Children of Hagar:
Gypsy Fascination in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Deborah Epstein Nord
(Princeton University)





FRIDAY 19th NOVEMBER, 2:45-4:30
(panels 13-18)




13. GOVERNANCE AND CONFLICT IN LATE MEDIEVAL ENGLAND


FRIDAY 19th NOVEMBER, 2:45-4:30 (panels 13-18), cont’d
 

14. REVISING THE REIGN OF CHARLES I

15. REGENCY POLITICS RE-EXAMINED FRIDAY 19th NOVEMBER, 2:45-4:30 (panels 13-18), cont’d
 
 

16. MAYHEW AND MELODRAMA


17. BORDER PATROLS: DEFINING DIFFERENCES IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITAIN AND BEYOND


FRIDAY 19th NOVEMBER, 2:45-4:30 (panels 13-18), cont’d
 

18. TOWARDS AN AESTHETICS OF ACQUISITION: GENDER, REPRESENTATION AND CONSUMPTION IN IMPERIAL BRITAIN



 


BUSINESS MEETING, NACBS
(Room: Somerset)

Presiding:
Fred M. Leventhal (President, North American Conference on British Studies)
 
 

BUSINESS MEETING, NECBS
(Room: Somerset)

Presiding:
Susan D. Amussen (President, Northeast Conference on British Studies)
 


FRIDAY 19th NOVEMBER, 5:15-6:15
 

PLENARY SESSION
(Room: Eastroom)

Chair:
Linda Levy Peck (Vice President, NACBS; George Washington University)
 

Presidential Address:

British Writers, American Readers:
Images of Britain During the Second World War

Fred M. Leventhal
(Boston University)






 
 

FRIDAY 19th NOVEMBER, 6:15-7:45

RECEPTION
(Room: Riverfront)
Announcement of NACBS Prizes





SATURDAY 20th NOVEMBER, 8:45-10:30
(panels 19-24)





19. NOBLES AND NOBLE POWER IN MEDIEVAL ENGLAND

20. SATIRE, SCANDAL AND HISTORY: RETHINKING POLITICAL AND RELIGIOUS DISCOURSE IN EARLY MODERN ENGLAND


SATURDAY 20th NOVEMBER, 8:45-10:30 (panels 19-24), cont’d
 
 

21. NEW PERSPECTIVES ON THE FAMILY: PART I, EARLY MODERN BRITAIN


22. THINKING GLOBALLY AND ACTING LOCALLY IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH POLITICS


SATURDAY 20th NOVEMBER, 8:45-10:30 (panels 19-24), cont’d

23. FIGHTING FOR THEIR LIVES: THE CULTURE OF VIOLENCE AND BRITISH MASCULINITIES IN THE NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH CENTURIES


24. THE SHAPING OF LIFESTYLES: THE POLITICS OF CONSUMPTION IN MID-TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN


SATURDAY 20th NOVEMBER, 10:45-12:30
(panels 25-30)




25. TAKING SIDES: IDENTITIES, LOYALTIES AND RELIGION IN EARLY MODERN ENGLAND


26. ROYALISM AND ITS AFTERMATHS

SATURDAY 20th NOVEMBER, 10:45-12:30 (panels 25-30), cont’d
 

27. READING OTHER PEOPLE’S MAIL: THE LETTER WRITER AND THE HISTORIAN (1640-1730)

28. NEW PERSPECTIVES ON THE FAMILY: PART II, MODERN BRITAIN


SATURDAY 20th NOVEMBER, 10:45-12:30 (panels 25-30), cont’d
 

29. CONSTRUCTING NATIONAL IDENTITIES, CONSTRUCTING IMPERIAL IDENTITIES

  30. THE REMAKING OF MID-TWENTIETH-CENTURY POLITICAL CULTURE




 
 

SATURDAY 20th NOVEMBER, 12:30-2:30

LUNCH
(Room: Grand Ballroom B)

PLENARY SESSION

Chair:
Linda Levy Peck (Vice President, NACBS; George Washington University)
 

Plenary Address:

The Significance of Oliver Cromwell

John Morrill
(University of Cambridge)
 
 

Professor Morrill appears with the generous assistance of the British Council

Unfortunately, due to illness, Professor Quentin Skinner will be unable to attend the conference and deliver his plenary addresss. John Morrill has graciously agreed to be our Saturday plenary speaker this year in his place.







 
 

SATURDAY 20th NOVEMBER, 2:45-4:45
(Special Session)





31. DEBATING THE FUTURE OF BRITISH STUDIES




SATURDAY 20th NOVEMBER, 5:00-6:30
(Special Sessions)





32. BRITISH STUDIES ON THE WORLD WIDE WEB


33. THE MAKING OF THE WORKING BRITISH HISTORIAN




 
 

SATURDAY 20th NOVEMBER, 6:30-7:30
RECEPTION
(Room: Riverfront)
 
 
 


SUNDAY 21st NOVEMBER, 9:00-10:45
(panels 34-39)





34. RELIGIOUS IMAGES AND THE LATE MEDIEVAL LAITY


35. NEW DIRECTIONS IN PARLIAMENTARY HISTORY


SUNDAY 21st NOVEMBER, 9:00-10:45 (panels 34-39), cont’d
 

36. BRITISH TASTE AND THE BRITISH EMPIRE, c. 1600-1900


37. MORALITY, REFORM AND ‘THE WANING OF OLD CORRUPTION’: PARTISANSHIP, INDEPENDENCE AND THE WELFARE OF THEBRITISH NATION, 1785-1832


SUNDAY 21st NOVEMBER, 9:00-10:45 (panels 34-39), cont’d
 

38. HIGHER EDUCATION IN VICTORIAN BRITAIN


39. FAMILY VALUES IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE: OCTAVIA HILL, ELEANOR MARX AND STELLA BROWNE



SUNDAY 21st NOVEMBER, 11:00-12:45
(panels 40-45)




40. ENGLAND AND EUROPE IN THE EARLY SEVENTEENTH CENTURY


41. RESISTANCE, REVOLUTION AND RELIGION IN THE THREE KINGDOMS, c. 1682-1693


SUNDAY 21st NOVEMBER, 11:00-12:45 (panels 40-45), cont’d
 

42. FRATERNITIES OF VAGABONDS: REAL AND IMAGINED CRIMINAL SUBCULTURES IN EARLY MODERN AND MODERN ENGLAND


43. SYMBOLISM, VOLUNTARYISM AND THE COMMON GOOD: DEFENDERS AND CRITICS OF CHURCH RATES IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY POLITICS AND SOCIETY

SUNDAY 21st NOVEMBER, 11:00-12:45 (panels 40-45), cont’d
 
 

44. VIRAGOS AND VIRTUOUS WOMEN: DOMESTICITY AND SEXUALITY IN THE NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH EMPIRE


45. LABOUR AND POPULAR POLITICS, 1918-1992: NEW VIEWS AND ASSESSMENTS



NECBS

phansen@wpi.edu
Last Modified: Oct 18 1999